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AMERICAN _

Cinemalogr

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The Magazine of Motion Picture Photography

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Carolyn Craig in a scene from the rain sequence in the Longridge Enterprises pro¬ duction, “Studs Lonigan,” produced by Phil Yordan, to be released by United Artists.

“THE TECHNICAL EXCELLENCE OF DU PONT SUPERIOR ® 2 AND 4 LETS ME CONCENTRATE ON THE ARTISTIC DEMANDS OF THE PICTURE"

says J. Arthur F eindel, A.S.C., Director of Photog¬ raphy on the production of James T. Farrell’s classic best seller, “Studs Lonigan.” “Camera work on today’s features is more than mere pic¬ ture taking,” explains Feindel, shown on the right in the photo with Director Irving Lerner setting up the rain sequence. “That’s why, in filming ‘Studs Lonigan,’ I was glad to rely on DuPont products and the service that goes with them.

Thanks to DuPont, I felt free to concentrate on the demands of the drama itself.”

DuPont films— and technical data on them

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DO, INC.

MUrray Hill 2-2928

JANUARY 1961

3

AMERICAN

Cinematographer

ARTHUR E. GAVIN, Editor

MARION HUTCHINS, Editorial Assistant

CONTRIBUTORS: Herb A. Lightman, Joseph V. Mascelli, Clifford V. Harrington, Joseph Henry, Frederick Foster, Libero Grandi (Rome), Jean Belanger (Paris), Derek Hill (London).

Technical Adviser: Dr. Norwood L. Simmons.

Editorial and Business Office: 1782 North Orange Drive, Hollywood 28, Calif.

Telephone: HOIlywood 7-2135

January, 1961

Vol. 42, No. 1

Feature Articles

. . . hallmark of superior cinematography

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CINEMATOGRAPHERS

FOUNDED January 8, 1919, the ASC was established to advance the art and the science of cinematography; to en¬ courage, foster, and strive for preemi¬ nence, excellence, artistic perfection and scientific knowledge in all matters per¬ taining to cinematography; to bring into closest confederation those leaders in the cinematographic science whose achieve¬ ments in that field entitle them to mem¬ bership in the Society; and to promote the interests of all who shall be called to membership in the ASC, that such membership may become a mark of honor and distinction based on merit.

MOVING CAMERA SHOTS BOOM SHOT TECHNIQUE THE TECHNIQUE OF FOLLOW-FOCUS

DAY-FOR-NIGHT SHOTS .

YOU’LL FIND IT IN THE MANUAL!

THE EXPERIMENTAL FILM

FILMING “SPARTACUS” IN SUPER-TECHNIRAMA

28

30

34

36

38

40

42

OFFICERS

Lee Garmes, President Hal Rosson, 1st Vice-president William Daniels, 2nd Vice-president Joseph Biroc, 3rd Vice-president Walter Strenge, Treasurer Charles Clarke, Secretary Victor Milner, Sergeant-at-arms

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Arthur Edeson, Daniel Fapp, George Fol- sey, Burnett Guffey, Sol Halprin, Ray Rennahan, John Seitz, and Philip Tan- nura.

Departments

INDUSTRY NEWS . .

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS . Walter Strenge 12

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSIGNMENTS . Marion Hutchins 14

WHAT’S NEW IN EQUIPMENT, ACCESSORIES, SERVICES . 22

ALTERNATE BOARD MEMBERS

John Arnold Harold Lipstein Farciot Edouart Virgil Miller Paul Vogel James Van Trees Charles Salerno Lucien Ballard Gilbert Warrenton Gordon Avil

pilllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllillllll

H AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, established 1920, is published monthly by the A. S. C. Agency, if Inc., 1782 N. Orange Dr., Hollywood 28, Calif. SUBSCRIPTION: United States and Canada, j| gj $4.00 per year; Foreign, including Pan-American Union, $5.00 per year. Single copies 35 cents; m H back numbers 45 cents; foreign single copies. 45 cents; back numbers, 55 cents. Advertising E gg rates on application. Copyright 1961 by A. S. C. Agency, Inc. Second-class postage paid at M Los Angeles, California. m

Committee Chairmen: By-Luws, Charles G. Clarke; Membership, Sol Halprin; Fi¬ nance and Publications, Arthur Miller; Public Relations, Stanley Cortez; Enter¬ tainment, Arthur Edeson; Research and Education, Farciot Edouart; Retirement Income-Insurance, Harold Rosson propa¬ ganda Picture, Ray Rennahan.

4

AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER

MITCHELL R-35

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Designed to cover the widest range of professional motion picture applications, the all new Mitchell R-35 reflex camera offers remarkable versatility to exceed the requirements of most discriminating cinematogra¬ phers. Streamlined design is combined for the first time with the full range of professional features by Mitchell world's leading source of truly professional motion picture cameras and equipment .

Designed to produce rock-steady films completely compatible with those of the well-known Mitchell BNC, NC and Standard cameras, the new R-35 dual register pin movement features: TWin regis¬ tration pins . . . twin pull-down claws; stop-motion to 120 EPS.; removable plate with built-in filter holder slot . . . holds two thicknesses of gelatin filters. Full size: 0.980" x 0.735", removable pres¬ sure plate, entire movement removable for clean¬ ing ... special construction insures foolproof insertion with no loss of timing.

COMPACT Incomparable R-35 Film

Movement

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JANUARY 1961

News briefs of

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INDUSTRY

NEWS

industry activities, products and progress

Film and TV Museum Approved

An important step in the realization of the motion picture and TV museum planned for Hollywood was taken last month when the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, by a 4-to-l vote, authorized appropriation of $162,500 in architects fees and ordered the county counsel to prepare enabling le¬ gislation which, if approved, would get the project underway.

At a meeting of the Board earlier in the month, the project was shelved temporarily because the Supervisors felt the motion picture industry should

LEE GARMES, ASC

. . . some ideas about the Hollywood Motion Picture and TV Museum.

put up half the estimated $4,000,000 cost of the Museum. Present at the meeting were many industry notables, including Mary Bickford, who asked, “How can we raise two million dollars in two weeks?” and added, “I feel our industry shouldn’t be put in such a position.”

According to present plans, the mus¬ eum. owned and operated by a non¬ profit corporation initially, would re¬ vert to County ownership in 30 years.

Lee Garmes, President of the Amer¬ ican Society of Cinematographers, who

ARTHUR MILLER, ASC

. . . appointed to Advisory Council of the Hollywood Motion Picture and Tele¬ vision Museum.

was among those present at the earlier meeting, said privately he believed that the Museum might successfully be owned and operated by the industry, even constructed with the financial as¬ sistance of industry crafts or through

donations made by the nations’ theatre owners on the basis of one-cent of every paid theatre admission.

Earlier, Arthur Miller, a former President of the ASC, was appointed to the Advisory Council of the Hollywood Motion Picture and Television Museum by Sol Lesser, Chairman of the Muse¬ um Commission. He was unable to at¬ tend the December 13th meeting with the Supervisors because of an out-of- town speaking committment.

Award To Karl Struss

Karl Struss, ASC. wras among those cited for outstanding achievement in the production of TV film commercials at the recent First Annual TV Com¬ mercial Festival and Forum in New York. Certificate of Merit presented Struss was for his work in photograph¬ ing the “Family Shopping Tour” com¬ mercial for Chevrolet Motors.

Blackburn Exits German Co.

Terminating active management during the past 35 years of W. J. German, Jnc., of California, Edward 0. Blackburn steps down from the of¬ fice of Vice-President and General

EDW. 0. BLACKBURN

. . . steps down from helm of W. J. German, Inc., in Hollywood.

Manager of the firm’s California or¬ ganization January 6th.

Through arrangements reached be¬ tween Blackburn and his Company, he will continue in a sales advisory capac¬ ity through 1961 and 1962, although he will officially leave his office this month.

William J. German, company presi¬ dent, is expected to appoint a succes¬ sor to Blackburn following his arrival in Hollywood early this month.

Continued On Page 8

AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER

The lights came from CHARLES ROSS!

Send lor o schedule of rental cates

LIGHTS

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JANUARY 1961

7

IMPORTANT!

Check this list

money.

ARRIFLEX 16mm camera, 3 lenses, motor, sunshade, ease, battery, charger, excellent . $1,395.00

AURICON Cine Voice, turret model, amplifier, sound acces¬ sories, case, exceptionally fine....$ 695.00

Portable power pack and battery charger for Cine Voice camera. ...$ 95.00

AURICON Pro-200 camera, ampli¬ fier, sound accessories, model 60

zoom lens . $ 945.00

Cine Special II camera, 100' cham¬ ber, 25mm Ektar f/1.4 lens, ex¬ cellent . $ 795.00

200' chrome chamber for above ....$ 325.00

100' chamber for above with con¬ verted top for Mitchell 400' magazine . $ 295.00

ARRIELEX 35mm camera, model 1, two 400' magazines, variable speed motor, sunshade, carrying case, with Cinekad blimp, syn¬ chronous motor, footage counter, follow-focus control, and B&H

geared tripod, compl. package.. $1,595.00

SOUND PROJECTORS

B&H model 179, two cases, 12"

speaker . - . $ 225.00

B&H model 185, single case, like

new1 . - . $ 245.00

B&H model 185, two cases 12"

speaker . - . - . $ 275.00

B&H model 385, two cases, 12"

speaker . $ 425.00

B&H model 302, single case, op¬ tical-magnetic, list $855.00, like

new . $ 625.00

Victor lightweight, two-case, 12" speaker . - . $ 165.00

Write today for catalog of other sale items!

INDUSTRY NEWS

Continued From Page 6

Arthur Miller Addresses SMPTE

Arthur Miller, ASC, last month ad¬ dressed the Northern California Sec¬ tion of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers in San Fran¬ cisco on “‘The Historical Aspects of Motion Picture Photography.” Miller, who photographed the bulk of “The Perils of Pauline” serials, illustrated examples of early day cinematographic techniques with old-time silent films, which were screened as part of his presentation.

Surtees’ “Ben-Hur” Cited

The country’s press motion picture critics and reviewers, and broadcast¬ ing’s film commentators voting in The Film Daily’s annual Filmdom’s Fa-

R0BERT SURTEES, ASC

. . . another award for his “Ben-Hur” filming.

mous Fives poll put “Ben Hur” at the top of the list of its Five Best Photo¬ graphed Pictures for 1960. “Ben-Hur’ was photographed by Robert Surtees, ASC, and won the Academy Award last year for Best Achievement in Col¬ or Cinematography.

Other films cited for Best Photogra¬ phy were “Jungle Cat,” By James R. Simon, Hugh A. Wilmar, and Floyd Beebe; “Sons & Lovers,” by Freddie Francis; “Elmer Gantry,” by John Alton; and “Suddenly Last Summer,” by Jack Hildyard.

# * *

Oscar Awards in April

The 33rd Annual Academy Awards presentation ceremomes will take place April 17th at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. The event will be televised and radiocast through facilities of the American Broadcasting Company. Switch from the traditional Hollywood Pantages Theatre to Santa Monica’s Civic Auditorium was necessitated by fact the Pantages was recently refur¬ bished and a great many of its seats

33rd Annual Academy Awards

VOTING TIMETABLE

Dec. 31 (Midnight)

AWARDS YEAR ENDS

Feb. 2 (Polls close Feb. 14)

MAIL NOMINATIONS BALLOTS (Acting, Directing, Writing and

Best Picture Awards)

Feb. 13 (Polls close Feb. 21

MAIL NOMINATIONS BALLOTS (Art Direction, Cinematography, Costume Design, Film Editing and Music Awards)

Feb. 27

ALL NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED

Mar. 4 thru Mar. 23

NOMINATIONS SCREENINGS IN ACADEMY AWARD THEATRE

Mar. 17

MAIL FINAL BALLOTS

April 3

FINAL POLLS CLOSE

April 17

AWARDS PRESENTATION

removed in coverting the theatre for exhibition of ultra-widescreen 70mm movies.

The Academy has appointed Steve Broidy Chairman of the Awards Pro¬ gram. The following members of the American Society of Cinematogra¬ phers are serving on the Cinematogra¬ phy Awards Rules Committee: Charles G. Clarke, Chairman; Farciot Edouart, George J. Folsey, Winton C. Hoch, Arthur C. Miller, and Hal Mohr.

Cinematographers serving on the Special Effects Awards Rules Commit¬ tee are: Farciot Edouart, Linwood G. Dunn, Paul Eagler, John Fulton, Ub Iwerks. and Hans Koenekamp.

Workshop Dates Announced

The Annual Calvin Workshop, con¬ ducted by Calvin Productions, Inc., Kansas City, Mo., will take place on the company’s sound stages February 13, 14, and 15, 1961. Any serious film worker is invited to attend and there is no cost or obligation, other than pro¬ viding his own accommodations and meals.

For those who require a personal in¬ vitation on the Calvin company’s letter¬ head, write to the company at 1105 Truman Road. Kansas City 6, Mo.

Industry Jobs at Peak

Employment level for studio crafts¬ men in Hollywood was at the highest level in 10 years early in December, with all unions reporting close to 100% employment of members, ac¬ cording to the industry trade-paper Hollywood Reporter. On December 8, 22 features and 114 TV films were be¬ fore the cameras in Hollywood stu¬ dios.

8

AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER

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CAMART CORE DISPENSER

Keeps film cores handy at all times. Attach to work table or wall. Easy to remove easy to fill. All aluminum construction. Adjustable to 16mm or 35mm cares.

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CAMART TIGHTWIND ADAPTER

The only Tight- wind Adapter with ball-bear¬ ing roller. Com¬ pletely scratch- proof. Chrome- plated, prevents cinching & ab¬ rasions. Winds film quickly & evenly. Single unit for 16mm and 35mm. Fits most any re¬ wind. Includes core adapter.

Price

Extra Core ad¬ apters ....$6.00 FOB New York

A.S. C. Begins 42nd Year

Cinematographers’ society, oldest craft organiza¬ tion in the industry, founded January 8, 1919.

VIEW OF LOUNGE of Hollywood clubhouse of American Society of Cinematographers, which the Society has occupied since December, 1936. Situated on the corner of North Orange Drive and Franklin Avenue, it previ¬ ously was the home of silent-film star Conway Tearle. Here Hollywood's top cinematographic tolent gathers once a month for dinner and informal discussions.

OoLEMNLY, AND without fanfare,

^ the American Society of Cinema¬ tographers will observe its 42nd Anni¬ versary on January 8th. The Society is the oldest craft organization in the motion picture industry, and its official establishment began when on January 8, 1919, the Society’s articles of in¬ corporation were approved by the State of California.

The Society’s founding fathers and charter members were fifteen of Holly¬ wood’s leading motion picture camera¬ men: Philip E. Rosen, Homer A. Scott, William C. Foster, L. D. Clawson, Eu¬ gene Gaudio, Walter L. Griffin, Roy Klafki. Charles Rosher, Victor Milner, Joseph August, Arthur Edeson, Fred L. Granville, J. D. Jennings, Robert S. Newhard, and L. Guy Willey. Of these, only Klafki, Rosher, Milner, Edeson and Wilky are alive today. All are retired.

Although January 8, 1919 marks the official beginning of the A.S.C., the movement for a society of cameramen actually began much earlier in New York, where America’s motion picture industry also had its beginning.

The formation of the first motion picture cameramen’s club in America took place in the Bronx during the summer of 1913. Philip Rosen and a number of other cameramen who then were working at the Edison studio for $18.00 a week started the ball rolling.

At the time a group of producers known as the Motion Picture Patents Company practically controlled the in¬ dustry, making it impossible for a cameraman to seek safe employment with independent concerns. So anony¬ mous notices were sent out to as many cameramen as it was possible to reach, summoning them to an organizational meeting.

On the appointed evening, thirteen men appeared, each a stranger to the others, and with no definite idea as to why they were present. A tempo¬ rary chairman was appointed and the motion picture cameramen’s first or¬ ganization, the Cinema Camera Club, was formed.

Shortly thereafter, a similar organ¬ ization was formed in Hollywood and known as the Static Club. Like the Cinema Camera Club, the Static Club was formed for purely social reasons to afford cameramen opportunity to exchange ideas, reveal job opportuni¬ ties, and for the general advancement of the motion picture cameraman and his work.

Later on, the Static Club changed its title to the Cinema Camera Club and an affiliation was formed with the New York group with an exchange of membership.

In 1918, the Hollywood group began to deteriorate as an organization and

Continued on Page 58

10

AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER

Color Iran

INTRODUCES THE

CINEMASTER CHIEF

TO CONTROL THE EQUIVALENT OF TEN 5-K’S

50,000 WAITS

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NATURAL LIGHTING CORPORATION

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PUSHBUTTON CONSOLE-

6 outlets independently controlled. Select exact color temperature from reading for each outlet built-in lamp protection interlock for pre-boost warmup.

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WIDER INPUT VOLTAGE CONTROL-

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MORE EFFICIENT LIGHT

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CINEKING $42 95

(With PAR-64 lamp, equals one 5-K.)

JANUARY 1961

11

WALTER STRENGE’S

CAMART DUAL SOUND EDITOR

Edit single and double system 16mm or 35mm optical sound.

9 Edit single system Magnastripe or double system magnetic sound.

9 Use with any 16mm motion picture viewer to obtain perfect lip-sync matching of pic¬ ture to track.

» Works from left to right or right to left.

Dual Editor without viewer . . $195.00

Zeiss Moviscop viewer . . $ 89.50

Editor-Viewer combination . $269.50

ARRIFLEX 16

16mm and 35mm cameras in stock for imme¬ diate delivery. Arriflex 16mm and 35mm soundproof blimps available. 400 maga¬ zines. Synchronous motors. New and Used.

CAMART BABY DOLLY

Only a four-wheel dolly will provide the balance and stability required for profes¬ sional motion picture production. Adjustable seat for cameraman, platform accommodates assistant.

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Cable: Cameraman

L

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Need advice on a picture making problem? Your questions are invited and will be answered by mail. Questions and answers considered of general interest ivill appear in this column each month.

In shooting a number of scenes recently with my new 16mm single¬ system sound camera, I encountered a great deal of unwanted background noise, such as that from automobiles passing in the distance, etc. Can you suggest how this can be avoided or at least minimized? A. A- H., Denver.

Answer : This is something that one learns to cope witli through experience and trial-and-error. When shooting ex¬ teriors as you describe, sound inter¬ ference from off-scene soruces can be minimized by operating with the mic¬ rophone placed as close as possible to the subject without intruding in the picture.

For example, if you would normally place the mike 6 ft. from the player in the scene, reducing the distance to 3 ft. will result in decreasing the amount of off-scene noise pickup by 6 decibels relative to the voice. Move it even clos¬ er say a foot-and-a-half and the noise is decreased another 6 decibels for a total of 12. Use of a directional microphone can also help, hut not as much as the remedy suggested above.

QI have seen the term “First trial composite print” in the literature and woidd like an explanation of the term and a description of the type of print referred to. J. McD., Portland , Ore.

Answer: The first trial composite print is the first composite print made from the picture and sound release nega¬ tives for the customer by the labora¬ tory for the purpose of checking and correcting picture and sound quality, negative cutting and assembly, etc.

Q Because it is readily available to us, we plan to use a 35mm film sound recorder to record the track for a forthcoming film to be shot and re¬ leased in 16mm. What method would you recommend for transferring the 35mm sound track to 16mm reduc¬ tion or contact? J. B. H ., Omaha, Neb.

Answer: Leading film laboratories, such as General in Hollywood and Kansas City, recommend that the sound for a 16mm reduction print be contact-printed rather than reduction- printed. This is because most 35mm

sound negatives normally are recorded for a frequency response range to at least 8000 cycles and a volume range of as much as 40 decibels, with 35mm reduction equipment in mind.

On the other hand, 16mm sound negatives are recorded with 16mm equipment and film speeds in mind. A 16mm sound system is usually capa¬ ble of reproducing a volume range of 20 decibels and frequencies of not more than 6000 cycles. Negatives re¬ corded for 16mm reproduction nor¬ mally incorporate compression to a volume range of 20 decibels or less and emphasis of the low7 and high fre¬ quencies.

Even though excellent optical reduc¬ tion prints can be made, optimum re¬ sults are obtained by recording a sep¬ arate sound negative for 16mm repro¬ duction.

QMy future work in cinematography will, for the most part, be witli color film and involve subjects where good color quality will be vitally im¬ portant. I have no experience as yet with color temperature meters. Please explain their function and importance in color photography. A. M A., Miami Beach, Fla.

Answer: A color temperature meter measures the color temperature of light sources used in motion picture photog¬ raphy. Its function is based on the principle that the spectral energy dis¬ tribution of light sources at different temperatures can be defined reason¬ ably accurate by stating the relative proportions of red and blue radiation which they emit.

This the color temperature meter does. Most meters of this sort operate by rotating a circular half-red, half¬ blue filter before a photocell. Where the blue content of the light is great¬ er or less than the red, the meter will so indicate on its scale. Such readings are generally indicated in terms of Kelvin degrees (or ‘‘degrees Kelvin ", as some prefer to term it), although some meters indicate what filters to use to obtain normal photographic result with a given color film.

Popular color temperature meters presently in use are Gossen Sixti-color, Rehikoff, and the Spectra 3-Color.

12

AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER

Birns & Sawyer Specializes in Arri Equipment : Rentals, Sales, Repairs, Trades, Purchases, Maintenance, and Special Design

Cable Address: BIRNSAW

BIRNS & SAWYER

CINE EQUIPMENT

6424 SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIFORNIA TELEPHONE: HOIlywood 4-5166

ARRI HEATER BARNEY

AQUARRI 16 BLIMP

UNDERWATER BLIMP, CAT. 5100

Efficient B & S heater parka keeps camera warm, film pliable in temperatures to 68° F. Highest quality materials and workmanship. $168. Other barneys for all cameras. Request brochure.

Super-strong welded marine aluminum housing available for camera, 400 magazine and volta- bloc battery. Top interchangeable for Arri 35. Special nose cone available for 5.7mm lens. $2,495. Catalog 5000.

New Underwater Housing Designed For Arri 16 & 35mm Cameras. Tops Change, as Base is Common. Welded Marine Aluminum Plate 3/e" thick. With¬ stands 60-minute Test at 300' Depth. Request Bro¬ chure. $2,495.

W-l-D-E, W-l-D-E LENSES

i (

Widest wide angle for Arri 35 from B & S optical shop. Sharp, crisp 14.5m F 3.5 Angenieux re¬ places larger, bulkier lenses. Arri mount $375, Mitchell NC mount $39S-

B & S Omnitar lenses fit 16 and 35mm Arris in focal lengths from 125mm through 1000mm, shown above with Mark III Omnipod cradle. Lens shown is F6.3, Catalog No. 1364, $795. See Your Dealer or Write for Brochure. Omnitars Consistently Best for Resolution, Color, and Brilliance.

B & S Multi-Layer Sound Barney for Arri 16 Cuts 80% °f Camera Noise on Location Shooting. Light¬ weight, Effective. Sold Only Through Franchised Arriflex Dealers. $99.50.

BALL-SOCKET HI-HAT, CAT. 1123

B & S Presents the First Hi-Hat Made Expressly for 16mm Arri Ball-Socket Tripod Head. Camera Levels Quickly, Easily. Eliminates Wedging. $34.00.

TRACKING FINDER, CAT. 2600

Great for Sports, Aerials, Moving Targets, etc. Fits Arri 16 for 25 & 50mm Lenses. Easily Attached and Removed. Folds Flat. $49,50.

CIN-AR ADAPTER

Adapt your Arri lenses to "C" mount cameras. On-Off in seconds. See your camera dealer. $16.50.

L-O-N-

G,

SOUND BARNEY, CAT. 1420

T816 BATTERY CHARGER

LONGER LASTING VOLTABLOC BATTERIES

Birns & Sawyer-designed voltabloc batteries guaranteed for longer, trouble-free life. All units encased in first grade cow¬ hide, have belt loop and shoulder strap. Compare!

8.4-Volt $115. 15-Volt $180.

ARRI 35 HI-HAT

Sturdy Hi-hat for mounting Arri 35 to standard tripod. Engineered struts. Base tapped for 3/»" and ’A" Tri¬ pods- $34.00.

L-O-N-G LENSES

End battery woes with B & S guaranteed, self-fused charger for all 8-V and/or 16-V Voltablocs. $49.50.

BIRNS & SAWYER ARRI PRODUCTS

Increase Range and Use of Arriflex Cameras In Sports, Aerials, Underwater, and Sound

JANUARY 1961

13

PHOTOGRAPHIC

WHAT THE INDUSTRY’S CAMERAMEN WERE SHOOTING LAST MONTH

By MARION HUTCHINS

NOTE: Asterisks indicate television film productions.

ALLIED ARTISTS

Carl Guthrie, ASC, “The Big Bankroll” (Bischof-Diamond Prod.) with David Jans¬ sen and Mickey Rooney. Joe Newman, director.

Robert Kraskeh. “El Cid” (Samuel Bron- ton Prods.; shooting in Spain) with Charlton Heston and Sophia Loren Anthony Mann, director.

Ernest Haller, ASC, “Armored Command" (shooting in Germany) with Howard Keel and Tina Louise. Byron Haskin, director.

AMERICAN NATIONAL

Curt Fetters, Monroe Askins, “Bat Mas- terson”* (Ziv-TV) with Gene Barry.

Monroe Askins, Jack Marquette, Richard Rawlings, “Case of the Dangerous Robin”* (Ziv-TV) with Rick Jason.

Monroe Askins, “Aquanaut"* (Ziv-TV) with Keith Larson and Jeremy Slate.

Richard Rawlings, “Klondike”* (Ziv-TV) with Ralph Taeger.

CALIFORNIA STUDIOS

Ray Foster, ASC, Commercials* (Audio Visual, Inc.).

CASCADE PICTURES

William Skall, ASC, Commercials*. George Folsey, ASC, Commercials*.

Roy Seawright, Commercials*.

Tyler Byars, Commercials*

COLUMBIA STUDIOS

Gert Andersen, ASC, “Donna Reed Show”* (Screen Gems) with Donna Reed. Andrew McCullough, director.

Joseph Biroc, ASC, “The Devil at 4 O’Clock” (Shooting in Hawaii; LeRoy- Kohlmar Prods.: G’Scope & Color) with Spencer Tracy and Frank Sinatra. Mervyn LeRoy, director.

Charles Lawton, Jr., ASC, “Two Rode Together” (John Ford Prod.; color; shoot¬ ing in Texas) with James Stewart and Richard Widmark. John Ford, director.

Douglas Slocombe, “Taste of Fear” (Ham¬ mer Films Prod.; shooting in England) with Susan Strasberg and Ronald Lewis. Seth Holt, director.

ROBERT SURTEES, ASC

Currently shooting “Mu¬ tiny On The Bounty” in Panavision and color in Tahiti for MGM.

Burnett Guffey, ASC, “Homicidal” (Wil¬ liam Castle Prod.) with Glenn Corbett and Patricia Breslin. William Castle, director.

Frf.d Gately, ASC, “Manhunt”* (Screen Gems) with Victor Jory and Pat McVey. Fred Jackman, director.

Fred Bentley, “Route 66"* (Screen Gems) with Marty Milner and George Mahares.

Charles Welborn, “Dennis the Menace”* (Screen Gems) with Joy North and Herbert Anderson.

Philip Tannura, ASC, “Two Faces West”* (Screen Gems) with Charles Bateman and June Blair.

Robert Bronner, ASC, “Gidget Goes Ha¬ waiian (shooting in Hawaii) with James Darren and Deborah Walley. Paul Wendkos director.

WILLIAM

MARGULIES, ASC

Directing the photogra¬ phy of “The Outlaw” TV film series at Para¬ mount studios, Holly¬ wood.

DESILU Cahuengo

Sid Hickox, ASC,